Hartford Hospital

Conditions In Depth

Search for

Nearly all cases of COPD can be prevented. Practice these preventive measures to reduce your risk of developing COPD.

Almost all COPD cases are caused by cigarette smoking. Never smoking, or quitting if you already smoke, are the single most important steps you can take to reduce your risk of developing COPD. This preventive measure is particularly important if you have family members who developed COPD at a young age (in their 30s or 40s).

Avoid exposure to:

  • Secondhand smoke
  • Dust
  • Fumes
  • Biomass smoke (such as smoke from burning wood, charcoal, crop residue)

Be aware of air pollution alerts. Avoid outdoor activities when air quality is particularly poor. Do not exercise in areas where levels of car exhaust are high.

Repeated lower respiratory infections, pneumonia, and bronchitis can produce scarring. This is particularly true in young children. Scarring contributes to the development of COPD. Whenever possible, try to avoid close contact with people who have contagious respiratory infections. Get a pneumonia vaccination if you are 65 years or older, or have risk factors for pneumonia. Make sure you get yearly flu shots.

If someone in your family developed COPD but never smoked, or developed the disease at an early age, you may have a genetic defect that increases your risk of the disease. You should consider having a blood test to measure levels of alpha-1-antitrypsin. This is an important protein that helps protect the lungs from damage due to inflammation. Low levels of this protein increase your risk of developing COPD. You should discuss this with your doctor.

References:

About COPD. American Lung Association website. Available at: http://www.lung.org/lung-disease/copd/about-copd. Accessed October 1, 2012.

COPD. American Association of Respiratory Care website. Available at: http://www.yourlunghealth.org/lung_disease/copd/index.cfm. Accessed October 1, 2012.

COPD. EBSCO DynaMed website. Available at: https://dynamed.ebscohost.com/about/about-us. Updated September 25, 2012. Accessed October 1, 2012.

Hu G, Zhou Y, et al. Risk of COPD from exposure to biomass smoke: a meta-analysis. Chest. 2010;138(1):20-31.

Kurmi OP, Semple S, et al. COPD and chronic bronchitis risk of indoor air pollution from solid fuel: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Thorax. 2010;65(3):221-228.

Respiratory disease associated with solid biomass fuel exposure in rural women and children: systematic review and meta-analysis. Thorax. 2011;66(3):232-239.

What is COPD? National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) website. Available at: http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/health-topics/topics/copd. Accessed October 1, 2012.

What you can do about a lung disease called COPD. Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease website. Available at: http://www.goldcopd.org/uploads/users/files/GOLD_Patient_RevJan10.pdf. Accessed October 1, 2012.

6/20/2011 DynaMed's Systematic Literature Surveillance https://dynamed.ebscohost.com/about/about-us: Po JY, FitzGerald JM, Carlsten C. Thorax. 2011;66(3):232-239.

Last reviewed October 2012 by Brian Randall, MD

Please be aware that this information is provided to supplement the care provided by your physician. It is neither intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. CALL YOUR HEALTHCARE PROVIDER IMMEDIATELY IF YOU THINK YOU MAY HAVE A MEDICAL EMERGENCY. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider prior to starting any new treatment or with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition.